LOADING

ASTM D1319 Crisis

The standardized testing method called ASTM D1319, is unarguably the most important test in the eyes of the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Aviation Administration, and fuel producers.

Developed in the mid-20th century, ASTM D1319 requires a special fluorescent dye and silica gel to complete the test.  The dye is in a worldwide shortage due to the sole producer no longer being in existence and the formulation is still attempting to be regulated by Honeywell UOP.

Without a replicate, there is concern of airports having ample certified fuel supplies due to unapproved jet fuel and the cost to produce fuel with alternative methods will go up exponentially.

There are alternatives today which are sustainable and employ modern separation and detection technologies.  This website is to serve as your resource to learning about the D1319 Crisis and how we can move forward while meeting today’s fuel regulations.

The goal of this website is to be a valid news source for the updates around ASTM D1319 and the alternative methods for each type of petroleum product. 

International Standard Equivalents: IP156, ISO3837, JIS K2536

What is ASTM D1319?

Year approved: 1954
Separation method: packed column
Level of complexity: low
Materials used: isoamyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol, FIA dye (recently discontinued), single glass capillary column, silica gel
Classes determined: saturates, olefins, aromatics
Speciation: none
Sample types: liquid petroleum products

Embed from Getty Images

Pros

$mo
  • FIA is a known, familiar technique
  • THE Referee method
  • Low cost to operate

Cons

$mo
  • Change in dye formulation has led to inconstant results
  • Dye reformulation only works with gasoline, not diesel or jet fuel
  • Reformulated dye, in the case of gasoline, will require a new interlaboratory study
  • Manual measurement technique ruler has a larger margin of error
  • Manual visual interpretation of the fuzzy boundaries must be done by a human, increasing human error

Image of FIA set up

Old Dye*

Per the diagram of FIA on the left, the old dye had very distinct color and ring separations based on where the different aromatics and olefins exist.

New Dye*

The image of the new dye doesn’t have the same ability to create clear, distinct colors and rings that allow for easy measurement of the different aromatics and olefins.

*Photos Courtesy of NEN

Where is ASTM D1319 Used?

Gasoline

Diesel

The EPA requires all gasoline and diesel fuels be tested using D1319 before being sold. The reason for this is because high levels of olefins and aromatics, which D1319 is used to measure, contribute to smog formation and decrease in efficiencies of engines.

Alternative Gasoline Methods

ASTM D8071

ASTM D6839

ASTM D6550

Alternative Diesel Methods

ASTM D5186

Jet Fuel

The FAA requires all jet fuel be tested using D1319 before being used. Just like in the case of aromatics in gasoline, high concentrations of these compounds contribute to gum buildup in jet engines. Buildup of gums can lead to jet engine failure, which has dire consequences.

Alternative Gasoline Methods

ASTM D8071

ASTM D6839

ASTM D6550

Alternative Diesel Methods

ASTM D5186

Alternative Jet Fuel Methods

ASTM D8267

ASTM D1840

ASTM D5186

ASTM D6379

Alternative Methods to D1319

ASTM D8071

ASTM D5186

ASTM D6379

Alternative Methods and What They Measure

 
Gasoline
Diesel
Jet Fuel
Aromatics
Di-Aromatics
Olefins
ASTM D1319
X
X
X
X
X
ASTM D8071
X
X
X
ASTM D6839
X
X
X
ASTM D6550
X
X
ASTM D5186
X
X
X
ASTM D6379
X
X
ASTM D1840
X
X
X
ASTM D8267
X
X
X